Adding a Nosedrive Drain


How they work          diagnosing problems          porting and polishing          rebuilding nosedrives          Swaps and upgrades          Adding a boost gauge         

replacing needle bearings     adding a nosedrive drain          supercharger oil change          pulley size suggestions          links, references, and sources


SCROLL DOWN FOR NEW CONTENT......added magnetic nosedrive plugs/drains to this page (Feb 2010)

 

How anal about changing supercharger oil are you?  According to the Factory Service Manuals from GM, it's a 'sealed for lifetime unit'.  Not surprising they would say this, considering how much a new supercharger or nosedrive costs from GM.  Many will say 100k will work for Supercharger oil changes, but in our current world of smaller pulley diameters and actually ENJOYING the supercharger, it's best to do it more often.  I may be in the extreme, but I do it twice a year.  The old method of changing it can be found here.  I wrote that procedure quite some time ago, before I dreamed up the drain.  It works, but there really isn't a GOOD way to get ALL the oil out.  Until now.

Next time you have your nosedrive off for rebuild or a coupler change, make a few minor modifications to it.  This procedure is based primarily on the M62, since I own two of them myself, but also applies to the other models (M45, M90, and M112).  What got me thinking about this was the Neuspeed M45 kit for the Volkswagen tuner crowd.  The way it sits in the engine bay, you can neither effectively drain nor fill the unit.  Let's get started!

This is the underside of the M62 nosedrive (find another suitable location on the M90, updates coming soon), and center punch your starting location:

 

Drill a small pilot hole.  1/8" or 3/16" will do fine.  Notice how it will overlap the ridge? And pick up the 'low spot':

      

 

Drill the pilot hole out with a letter "R" drill.  I missed my target by a bit, as I wanted the hole to intersect the lower 'step you see in the right picture, but we'll work that out in a step or two.  Getting that hole to intersect the lowest part will insure draining as much oil as possible when the drain is opened:

      

 

Tap with a 1/8-27 (NPT) tap:

 

If you miss the target like I did, use a rat-tail file to open up the tapped hole to the lower shelf.  Click on the pictures to enlarge them enough to see:

      

 

Now you need to test fit the whole mess to determine what fittings you need and what angle to set them at in order to be able to access the fitting with tools for removal/draining later.  I chose the angle and fittings shown, but get creative and use what works best for you:

      

After test fitting, assemble all the components using the red nosedrive sealant as a thread sealer.  Make sure you don't plug the end of the drain inside the nosedrive (put the drain in before installing the nosedrive onto the supercharger).  This sealant is naturally resistant to heat and Supercharger oil. 

Have another beer.

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 NEW CONTENT M62 Magnetic fill/drain plugs

 Another idea is to replace the fill port plug with a magnetic plug, or even go as far as to add a magnetic drain plug in the same bottom location shown in the procedure above.  Better yet, do both (you'll see why).  The magnetic plugs can trap steel particles that wear off the gears, prevent them from circulating in the oil, and extend the life of the gears.  I buy my magnetic plugs from www.canadiansupercharger.com

 

WARNING:  If you're not fully rebuilding the nosedrive when you do this, make sure you tightly wrap a rag or strong paper towel around the coupler plate (the one with three pins) to prevent aluminum shavings from getting into the bearing behind it.  Clean the nosedrive out very well afterwards.  If you want to use a solvent, use WD-40, then let it drip-dry well before assembly.

Drill and tap the hole as shown in the drain procedure above.

 

After cleaning the mess up, install the plug with teflon tape or sealant/rtv.

 

This is what it looks like from inside.

 

This shows the magnetic plug installed in BOTH the new drain location (from procedure above) and in the OEM port location.

 

Plug on the left is from the top (original plug) location.  Plug on the right is from the lower (new drain) location.  Gravity is your friend, put a magnet down low.  This is after about 2500 miles from install.

 

Closeup.  That black gunk is primarily steel particles from the gears.  New plug on the right is un-used.

 

NEW CONTENT M90 Magnetic fill plug

The same thing can be done for the M90 (both the Gen3 and Gen5).  The magnetic plugs can trap steel particles that wear off the gears, prevent them from circulating in the oil, and extend the life of the gears.  I buy my magnetic plugs from www.canadiansupercharger.com

Remember to protect that bearing behind the drive plate (the plate with pins) with a rag wrapped tightly around it unless you plan to rebuild the nosedrive anyway.

 

 


How they work          diagnosing problems          porting and polishing          rebuilding nosedrives          Swaps and upgrades          Adding a boost gauge         

replacing needle bearings     adding a nosedrive drain          supercharger oil change          pulley size suggestions          links, references, and sources


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